What are the ways to use Super Glue in the shop? I’m interested in different viscosities and results with accelerators, etc. for various applications.—William Taylor

Jeff Lind replies: Super glue can be used in many ways. Here are a few. Small areas in spalted maple can be stabilized with a few drops. Sometimes a second application is needed. Larger soft spots do well with Git Rot or other epoxy preparations.

Small cracks, gaps, defects or holes can be filled with a super glue preparation. Place a drop in the affected area, sprinkle with sanding dust, pack it in, add another drop of glue, and more sanding dust, etc. Let it harden, trim off and sand out. Edge defects can be formed with blue painters tape and then filled with sanding dust and super glue (as above). Buy super glue at the Dollar Store.

I have used super glue to stabilize small spots on spalted maple. On larger sections, I have successfully used Git Rot, but it takes weeks to harden properly before it can take a finish.

Burt Ouellette replies: Just recently I discovered that super glue makes great “double-sided tape” for attaching routing patterns. Start by placing a pair of 2˝ blue tape squares in matching locations on the pattern and stock. Two 2˝ squares are plenty. Then put a small drop of super glue on one set of tapes and clamp the pieces together for a couple of minutes. You are then good to go. After routing, pry the pattern and stock apart. Not only does the blue tape leave no gummy residue on the stock, it’s quite a bit cheaper than conventional double-sided tape.

Garrett Hack replies: Superglue is weak as a wood glue. I think Titebond is stronger (and easier) for gluing little chips back in place. But Super Glue works well as a filler and adhesive for shell inlay or other unusual materials, or for filling small surface defects. I’ve used it to repair cracks and holes in ebony, invisibly. I like medium viscosity because it is thin enough to get into the cracks, but doesn’t drip. It is strongest if you let the glue cure naturally.

Glue